Hump Day Kick Start – Writing Prompt #62

Writing prompts to kick-start your muse.

 

Not gonna lie. Sometimes I wish this was me.

So who is the note to? Who wrote it? Could this be a proverbial finger to the taxman? A note on an airline beverage napkin from D.B. Cooper? An impersonal letter left for a lover? A taunt flashing across the CIA’s communications system from a cyber attacker? A dare by the Hide and Seek World Champion?

Share your ideas and/or post your creations, even if it’s just a line or two. I’d love to hear them.

2 Responses to Hump Day Kick Start – Writing Prompt #62

  1. Jeff Salter says:

    “What’s that on the board?” asked Timmy, as he clutched Jane, the girl with pigtails who sat in front of him every day in fifth grade.
    “What do you mean?” asked Jane.
    “Look,” he said, pointing vigorously. “A message.”
    Jane read it carefully, then stared at Timmy. Then she read it again, this time out loud. “Huh?”
    At this moment, they were the only two students in class… the others out on the playground for recess. Mean old Miss Grumpee had kept then inside — detention — because she’d caught Timmy trying to kiss Jane. Or maybe it was Jane trying to kiss Timmy. Didn’t matter now. Here they were — imprisoned for 20 minutes — just the two of them.
    And they see this crazy message on the ancient chalk board.
    The school building itself was erected in about 1911 and looked like every other public school of that era in the deep South. Ceilings about 16 feet, huge windows around two sides of that corner class room, and a full length cloakroom accessible through a door adjacent the teacher’s desk at the left front corner of the room.
    Students were never allowed in the cloakroom, and none of them shed their jackets or coats during winter anyway — since the ancient school structure was heated by radiators that had arrived with the Mayflower.
    “Well, never mind that stupid message,” stated Timmy. “Where’s Miss Grumpee?”
    “I think it was Miss Grumpee who wrote that message,” replied Jane.
    “This is nuts. How can we be on detention and there’s no teacher here?”
    “I don’t know. But from the way that message reads, I think maybe Miss Grumpee IS here… somewhere.”
    “You mean invisible?”
    “Well, maybe more like hidden,” answered Jane.
    “So what do we do now?”
    “I guess we’ll have to find her.”
    Timmy scanned the room. “Only one place to hide in here and that’s underneath her desk. But Old Lady Grumpee couldn’t squeeze herself under there… unless she’s a witch and can turn herself into black cat.”
    “Not a witch, maybe,” replied Jane. “But she’s definitely odd at times.”
    “So where else can we look for her?”
    Then, with wide eyes, they looked at each other and said, nearly in unison, “The cloakroom.”
    Timmy was already shaking his head. “I’m not going in there. Last year a fifth grader got brave and went inside and he was never seen again.”
    “Huh? Who was that?”
    “Don’t remember his name. But he’s gone now,” replied Timmy sagely.
    “Who told you that?”
    “Everybody knows it.”
    “Well, I don’t know it. And I don’t think there’s anything in that dark, creepy cloakroom besides antique books and boxes of old book reports.”
    “You’re not seriously planning to go in that cloakroom, are you?”
    “Not me — WE,” she replied.
    After ginning up his courage, Timmy finally rose from his seat and followed Jane to the doorway. Both peered in.
    Nothing to see. If there’d ever been a light bulb in that ceiling fixture, it was probably the second one Edison made by hand… and burned out a generation ago.
    “See anything?” asked Timmy.
    “Not yet. We need to get inside so our eyeballs get used to the dark. Like cats and dogs.”
    Just as they each took one more tentative step inside that pitch black space, a loud voice boomed, “BOO!”
    The children jumped eight feet in the air and then hugged each other in abject fear.
    There stood Miss Grumpee! “Now get back into your seats. You’re still in detention.” There was a wry smile on her face… and it was the very first time any kid at that school had ever seen her smile.

    Liked by 1 person

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