Link of the Week – Reedsy & ME!

February 12, 2019

Many of you know that I am a freelance editor. I’ve been at it for 6+ years. I have worked with authors at every stage of their careers, including USA Today and NY Times best sellers. I specialize in line and developmental editing. Romance is my passion, especially the subgenres paranormal, urban fantasy, historical, erotic, and suspense. I have been known to work with mystery and sci-fi authors, as well.

Today’s link of the week is my profile with Reedsy. Reedsy is a place which “connects authors and publishers with the world’s best editors, designers, and marketers to create high-quality books”. Boom!

https://reedsy.com/jennifer-bray-weber


Link Of The Week-An Editor Extraordinnaire

August 30, 2016

We all know and love Jennifer Bray Weber! She’s a talented author who has won many awards and is multi-published. I’m one of her biggest fans!

But, did you know she’s also an amazing editor? Jennifer has worked with best selling authors and those just beginning. Here’s what one author has to say about her services:

“Jennifer Bray-Weber has an excellent eye for details, story telling and the mechanics of writing. She offers a comprehensive line edit as well as a thorough look into the nitty-gritty details of your story to make sure that it is cohesive. I enjoy her style and approach. Her feedback was spot on and truly helped me enhance my story, drawing out my voice, without losing any of the creativity and uniqueness of the story. Additionally, she helped me immensely with historical wording (etymology). I can’t recommend her enough!”

Eliza Knight, award-winning author.

We all need tools in our belt to produce the manuscripts possible- this is one tool you don’t want to miss!IMG_5556

 

http://www.jbrayweber.com/editing–critiquing-services.html


It’s Pitch Day! Holly Atkinson with Samhain is our guest editor!

April 19, 2014

UPDATE:

There were only six viable pitches for Holly this editor shop. I’ll be sending them on directly to her, and I’ll send any authors whose pitch made it in an e-mail.

Thanks for participating, Happy Easter, and good luck to the lucky ones who made it in.

GO!!!

It’s been a while since our last pitch session!

Welcome everyone. Holly will be here tomorrow to look at the pitches that make it through today.

Remember to read the rules before you pitch. I really don’t like deleting pitches for foolish mistakes, but rules are rules. If you look back at past Agent/Editor Shops, I do delete if you don’t follow the guidelines. Even for something as simple as going over the pitch word count by a word.

SO now that that’s out of the way. Please wait to send your pitches in when you see the word go posted at the top of this post in big green letters! If you send it before that, I will delete it. I’ll post the word go around 10:00 am EST.

While you’re waiting, check out one of Holly’s authors:

ORIGIN by Dani Worth

Origin72lg

In the race for freedom—and love—there’s no holding back.

The Kithran Regenesis, Book 4 

After fourteen torturous years as a slave on a galaxy roving entertainment ship, Siri carries only vague memories of parents who loved her, Gwinarian food, and her beautiful home planet of Kithra.

When two space pirates burst into her owner’s room, the choice they offer her is all too easy: stay and face government questioning about the two intruders, or take a chance and go with them.

Claybourne and Anders had planned to help expose the pleasure ship owner’s involvement in Kithra’s destruction. But when they happen upon Siri, saving one of the last—and most beautiful—of the Gwinarian race takes precedence. 

Siri tastes freedom long denied…and temptation to succumb to the deep sexual tension vibrating between her and her two liberators. Clay and Anders take pleasure in letting her take the lead in rediscovering the power of intimacy. 

But there are more secrets to uncover, and Siri senses that the closer they come to the truth, the closer she comes to the most painful choice of all—to let her pirate lovers go.

Warning: Sexy human space pirates. An acerbic-tongued crew. A beautiful wounded alien woman. M/M/F sparks galore, and interplanetary intrigue.

Links:

Where to buy:

Samhain

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Find Dani at:

Website

Twitter

Good luck to everyone pitching today!

Candi


It’s ALMOST time to pitch! $25 Giftcard giveaway right now!

January 11, 2013

I can’t tell you all how excited I am for Editor Shop in the morning. Well , maybe you can tell since I’m posting before I usually do… 🙂

smile

PRIMITIVE NIGHTS released from Samhain on Jan 8th. and to celebrate, Jennifer Miller (my editor) agreed to be our attending editor. NINE other authors from Samhain agreed to come tomorrow as well and we’re all giving away prizes!

I’ll start taking pitches around 10:00 am EST on Jan 12th. But please don’t send me anything until you see the word ‘GO’ posted in big letters as an update at the top of the morning post. Once it’s there, send your pitch to candi_agent_shop (at) yahoo.com.

BIG, HUGE, WARNING! We’re going to be swamped in the morning, so read the rules for pitching under the tab at the top of the page titled Agent/Editor Shop please. I delete without prejudice. If you don’t follow the rules, you’re out!

So just for fun tonight, and of course because I want everyone looking at my cover… Anyone who tells me what my MALE main character’s name is will be entered to win a $25.00 giftcard to Amazon or Barnes&Noble! I’ll draw a winner tomorrow before I post the word GO, and as a bonus, anyone who comments between now and then will also be entered in the big drawing for books tomorrow!

Read the blurb and excerpt from Primitive Nights at the links below:

PrimitiveNights

Samhain

Amazon

Barnes&Noble

Have a great night and good reading to you all!

Candi


Is it Sunday already…?

December 9, 2012

I’m not sure it’s entirely sane to go an entire day, attending my son’s handbells concert, selling X-mas trees with scouts, running from here to there and everywhere in between, to finally sit down and realize it’s Sunday…

Where did the time go and what’s up with my lack of wordcount?

Once again, this weekend was not my friend. Total words written? 2128. Ugh. But I guess progress is progress.

So I couldn’t practice what I usually preach, which is write no matter what. I guess we all fall into the holiday craziness sometimes. Oh well. I’ll plan to make it up this week. Here’s to HOPE! Anyone care to share their wordcount. I’d love to hear from you all. Did you smoke me? Did you match me? Did your wordcount make mine look stellar? 🙂

I did have an awesome e-mail this weekend though. So pardon me while I gush…

I got the okay to share my official title for STAY, the first in The Changing Tides series from Samhain coming Aug. 6, 2013!

Check it out!

Stay300

I haz a pretty! 🙂

Hope everyone had a wonderful weekend. And don’t forget, this weekend Rhonda Penders with The Wild Rose Press will be our guest editor! Get those pitches ready for Saturday.


Edits, Drama, and the Murder of an Epilogue

November 9, 2011

Song of the Day: Rolling in the Deep by Adele

Edits. Love ‘em or hate ‘em?

I think most of us have heard of revision hell. Conversely, we all know that someone who so rock, their editors have nothing to refine. So when my time came to be professionally edited, I had no idea what to expect.

The past few weeks I’ve been working on rounds of edits with my editor (I never get tired of saying that – my editor). Denise is fan – flipping – tabulous. And thus far, I’ve enjoyed the editing experience.

I look pretty good as a brunette.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not strolling through a field of poppies, barefoot and fancy free. I’m not one of those authors who so rock. No, I completely short circuit over doing revisions on a deadline and I’m convinced that Murphy’s Law requires that life heads into upheaval at the same time. Let’s face it, 14 days or less for revisions translates to 14 hours or less for this mom of a rambunctious toddler and ever-dramatic preteen.

I'm not being overly dramatic, am I?

Add in the momentary lapse of sanity with shameless sobbing, fist-pumping, and foot-stomping when I had to delete my entire epilogue. My epilogue that ties everything in a neat, pretty bow. My epilogue that hints to what’s to come in the next book. My epilogue that so rocked! Noooooooooo…

Other than that, I’ve been lucky, or maybe I just fake it well. My edits overall have been rather painless.

Action, adventure, romance. Check

Good grammar. Check.

No plot holes. Check.

Flowing sentence structure and pleasing cadence. Check.

Clear logistics. Check.

Drool-worthy libertine pirate with insatiable appetite. Check.

Tee Hee

My editor (giggle, snort, giggle) encouraged me to dive deeper into character motivation and helped pull the ropes tighter in my writing. Together, we spit-shined my novel squeaky clean. God love her, she found my amorous scenes hot and well written, and even asked that I add another. Gladly. Can’t have too much lovin’ to make your toes curl.

That woman’s got an eagle eye, too, picking out repetitive verbiage and phrases. Apparently, I have an affinity for certain words. They magically appear over and over in my book, this despite that I am usually very cautious about repetition. Still a few slipped past. Damn you CPs! *shakes fists*

Listen up, authors. She says she literally sees the following phrase, or variations

Even the dog is narrowing his eyes.

of, in every single manuscript that crosses her desk. She narrowed her eyes. Confession. I did this five times in the novel. Five! Everyone was narrowing their eyes. Ugh.

I’m not unique. Every author does this. We’re so wrapped up in conveying thoughts, emotions, and actions just right, we simply do not notice we’ve been repetitive. In an 80-100K book, it’s easy to overlook the same phrase or word.

Just when I thought we were finished, the copy editor sends it back. Writing historical fiction has its own challenge by way of proper words usage, terminology, and dialect. I have done extensive, exhaustive research on words, trying my best to avoid anachronistic terms. Imagine my surprise when the CE sent my novel back full of flagged words. *sigh* It’s times like these I wonder how I made it this far.

So how do we avoid these pitfalls? Get a good editor. Employ awesome critique partners. Besides that? Well, reading aloud works. Doing a ‘Find’ in Microsoft Word for any word you favor or think you’ve used more than once will help, as well. Do your research. And just be vigilant. No one is perfect. That’s why we have a team of peeps saving our asses.

Dear epilogue, you will be missed.

Now, please. A moment of silence for my dearly departed epilogue.

How about you? Do you have any favorite words that sneak into your manuscripts time and again? How about editing? How has the editing process worked for you? I’d love to hear from you.


Interview with Author, David Rocklin

December 18, 2009
  •  Strategies for getting and keeping a qualified Agent.

  •  “Taking the Long Way Home” with foreign publication.

Hello, everyone. Let’s welcome our guest today, David Rocklin, the author of “The Luminist.” His debut novel will be published overseas in Italy (Neri Pozza) and Israel (Kinnaret). It is to be submitted for publication in the UK, and is scheduled to make its first appearance here in the United States in 2011 (Hawthorne Books). It’s an elegant novel described by Mohrbooks as: “In the spirit of ‘The Piano Tuner,’ David’s first historical, ‘The Luminist,’ is a beautifully written, page-turner about politics, war, art, and family that will linger in your memory long after you raced towards the last page.”

Q: Welcome, David. Tell us a little about yourself.

I was born and raised in Chicago, and moved to Los Angeles in 1990 to pursue writing; I’d felt that I couldn’t write while living where I was originally from. I felt the need to see what I’d experienced up to that point from a greater distance. I have a degree in Literature (we with degrees like to capitalize the word) and went into law. I now mediate employment cases and write – not in that order, I’m happy to say.

Q: A successful attorney with a degree in Literature (notice the capitalization). I can’t imagine balancing time between two challenging careers. How do you manage? Was professional writing always your ultimate ambition?

It’s a challenge, mostly to keep my head on what I’m doing while not writing. The writing seeps into just about every facet of me. I stay up late, a lot. We also have a toddler at home, so I’ve become a bit adept at multi-tasking mentally.

Q: On any scale, I don’t think there’s one of us who can’t appreciate those challenges you describe. Multi-tasking and time-sharing seem a way of life for writers. Tell us about “The Luminist” and what inspired the story?

The Luminist was initially inspired by an installation of Victorian-era photography at the Getty Museum in Southern California. The character of Catherine Colebrook is very loosely suggested by the life and work of  Julia Margaret Cameron, one of the first photographic pioneers. Her pictures of children were especially haunting, at once warmly immediate and bittersweet; those lives are, after all, lost to us now. After the exhibition and a bit of research, I discovered (among other things) that Ms. Cameron experienced the death of one her youngest children, as did so many in colonial Ceylon. It struck me that Ms. Cameron’s stated desire to “arrest beauty,” to select a moment from the thousands comprising her life and hold it apart from mere memory, might have arisen from that grievous loss as much as from scientific curiosity and the will of a strong woman to escape some of the limitations of Victorian life. What followed – research into colonial life in Ceylon, the traditions of Victorian photography, a plunge (inadequate, I’m certain) into the religions, cultures and customs of India – really began there, with photographic relics and writerly imaginings about the woman who made them.

Though the novel deals with matters of history (figures such as Sir John Holland, who is based very loosely on the great Victorian scientist Sir John Herschel, and of course Catherine and her husband and children, again, loosely modeled on Ms. Cameron’s family), as well as the origins of photography (including its genesis from sunprints to glass and beyond) and India herself during the period in question, I have taken broad liberties with each. My apologies for any tampering with these worlds in the interests of fiction.]

Q: I see that the Luminist will soon be hitting book stores in the United States in early 2011, with allowances for marketing and promotion. How did this novel come to be acquired first overseas?

My absolutely incomparable agents (Christy Fletcher and Melissa Chinchillo/Fletcher & Co.) took the novel to the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2008, where the rights sold to Italy and Israel. At that point there hadn’t been a sale here in the States, and I’m told that foreign publishers do not as a rule acquire a title before English speaking rights are sold, both for copyright and marketing reasons. So I actually felt very good about those sales, as they represented two publishing houses who thought strongly enough about the novel to take that sort of chance on it. I will always remember that Italy and Israel came through before anyone else.

Q: It’s difficult enough for most writers to navigate the complexities of business here at home, but untangling foreign rules… It seems you’re destined to become literature’s Cinderella Man. The quote by Mohrbooks impressively describes your work as written in the spirit of “The Piano Tuner,” also a powerful historical and debut novel. With how far you’ve traveled on the path to publication, was there ever a reality check? How surprised were you to see your debut novel received so warmly?

I was thrilled and extremely gratified at how the novel was received. My agent  – to whom I had submitted via recommendation of a friend and mentor who in turn had read it and thought highly of it, thankfully – read it in a day, which is about as wonderful a thing as a writer can ever hope to hear. It did take a while for the novel to find a home in the states, having gone out to the US publishers right at the economic meltdown, which has and continues to have a disastrous impact on the publishing industry. But my agents felt so confident and were so irrepressibly bullish, that I frankly sat back, started working on a new one and let the novel find its way. I am very excited to be with Hawthorne. If your readers get a chance to visit their website (www.hawthornebooks.com), I think they’ll find a truly eclectic and praiseworthy body of literature.

I think we all have a way of tying our experiences, our hopes, our memories and emotions wanted and unwanted, to some sort of vessel in order to make sense of them – or to make them resonate even more deeply than they already do. A memory is enhanced, or even informed, by a song or a movie scene. The beginnings of a cherished relationship belong not just to us, but to the city, the apartment window, the favorite restaurant, that served as the paving stones we walked while feeling it grow.

For me, writing – my own, that of others – is and has been that vessel, that vehicle that allows me to see the world. If I can be that, for even one person, I will die happy.

Q: I think you describe, perfectly, the passion we all have for the craft. And your work is, indeed, in the company of impressive titles at Hawthorne. You describe yourself as, “Taking the long way home.” I think we understand the inference – the long journey of a dream about to become realized. Would you describe how your novel found a home with a U.S. publisher? For an author, how involved is the process of translation and editing?

It really came about because my agents simply would not give up. As a writer, you dream of finding agents and editors who feel the way you do, who also burn to get that writing out into people’s hands and hearts. The folks I’ve met thus far – Christy, Melissa, my editor/publisher at Hawthorne – are outstanding at what they do, and a joy to be able to work with. I’m lucky beyond belief.

The translation process should be interesting – right now, I’m in the editorial revision process, and we hope to have something in final form by late summer 2010, after which the process of marketing and promotion will truly begin. The final will also be sent to all foreign territories who have shown interest, and will be sent to the publishers who have acquired it. As I understand it, they will translate and will be in touch with me to go over passages, ideas or words that might not have an equivalent meaning, and we’ll work out the differences. Having spent a bit of time trying unsuccessfully to learn Mandarin, I know some things will literally be lost in translation.

The editorial process is quite involved. The more involved it is, the luckier the author – that means they have an editor who has done what the author did throughout the writing of their work. They’ve immersed themselves in the story, in the words, in the lilt of the language and the melody of the sentences as they run together. It’s a fantastic learning experience, and I know my next novel will be the better for it.

Q: We should all be as fortunate to discover an agent or editor who loves our work and brings that kind of imaginative persistence to the business. So, here’s what every aspiring writer wants to know – How did you hook your literary agent? And please share with us the details and tactics you’ve discovered for getting and keeping a qualified agent?

For “The Luminist,” I was lucky to have a friend and mentor, Susan Taylor Chehak (an extraordinary author – please do pick up one of her several novels) read the book. She was very excited about it and suggested that she let a good friend of hers read it – my agent, as it turned out.

I’ve been down both roads (recommendation, query) in terms of locating and acquiring an agent, having queried a fair number in connection with an earlier novel I’d written that was submitted and not published (probably for the best). It’s a daunting process, but one that a writer can accomplish successfully with just a few tips. First, really try to establish for the agents why it is that you’re querying them, and not the agent next door to them. Show them you know their work, their clients, and that you belong in their stable. An easy bit of research will help – most authors thank their agents on the acknowledgement page of their novel (if they don’t, they really should). Think about writers/books that you believe your own work should be placed in the company of (be realistic, and yes, you do have to pigeonhole your novel a bit). Find the agents’ names, or names that aren’t identified as someone’s wife, boyfriend or mother. Cross reference them using one of the many guides to literary agents, or search them on the web. Now you have targeted an agent, and you know something about them – who and what they represent.

Next, don’t send your book out before it’s really ready to be seen. Have it read, preferably by a good workshop peopled with writers who are passionate, well-read and deeply involved in the writing life themselves. If you don’t have access to anything like that, have it read by at least three people who aren’t your wife or mother (and therefore don’t feel like giving you critical feedback is tantamount to rejecting you). Listen and revise. My grandmother used to say, “if someone calls you an ass, they’re rude. If two people call you an ass, you’re probably an ass.” If you hear similar feedback from more than one person, you may be looking at an issue that needs to be revised no matter how strongly you feel about it, as it’s impacting the reading/reception of your work.

A perfect close. Sage advice that should be stenciled on every computer screen — Grandmothers always seem to know how to reach the core with an impressive economy of words. We should have her here as a guest.

Thanks for coming, David. It’s fascinating to watch the genesis of a talented new author and discover the inspiration behind the writer and his story. There’s something here for everyone. Your transnational experience, your steep path to publication, and your advice for finding and keeping the perfect agent offer keen insight for both the established an aspiring author. We look forward to seeing your title in the bookstores.

David’s Website is currently under construction, but until then, you can follow his progress  on Facebook

David is happy to answer all comments or questions below. And if you need legal advice from lawer, David Rocklin… well, he may have left that hat at the office.

News Flash: Sorry I missed this. David is offering a free copy of “The Luminist” to the first TWENTY-FIVE commenters. Yikes — Happy Holidays from David!