Triberr – An Author’s Quick Guide

October 17, 2012

Song of the Day: Unity by Shinedown

(This post originally appeared October 5, 2012 on The Ruby-Slippered Sisterhood blog.)

So what is this Triberr people keep talking about? How does it work, and, more importantly, do I have to dress in animal pelts and coif my hair with chicken bones if I join?

Let’s break down Triberr into easy digestible chunks, shall we.

First, what exactly is Triberr? In short, Triberr is a reach multiplier. Huh? What does that mean? Triberr is a community of bloggers who also double has pimps, or marketing tools. These bloggers band together in tribes and share blog posts. When one tribe member posts a blog, the blog is tweeted through Twitter by all the other tribe members.

What is a tribe? No, it’s not drinking the Kool-aid. Tribes are collaborative groups of bloggers that often have a commonality. In our case, that might be writers and reviewers. Groups might consist of cliques for a more narrow target market, such as authors who write historical, erotica, thriller, etc. Tribe mates in these classification specific units share quality, relevant content and networking, and often provide guest posting opportunities.

How does it work? Triberr easily manages this through the RSS feeds (every blog had one). Triberr automagically imports blog posts into the tribal stream (much like a Twitter stream or Facebook wall) which is shared by all tribe mates. Tribe mates then share these posts with their Twitter followers, either manually or automatically.

I’ll give you an example. Say I write a fascinating post on Caribbean pirates. For simplicity’s sake, let’s assume I have 10 tribe mates. My one post is tweeted 10 times. Now think about how many Twitter followers each of my mates might have. Also think about how many people integrate their Twitter accounts with other social media networks like Facebook. The number of possible exposure grows exponentially. And what if you belong to more than one tribe? Whoa! Now that’s driving traffic to your site.

Let’s one-up that. Every tribe mate can reblog your post. Reblogging through Triberr offers extra incentives. Let’s go back to my pirate post. Tribe mate Johnny thinks my post is pretty awesome. He reblogs it on his blog, putting my article in front of a new audience. Any comments made to the post on Johnny’s blog will show up on mine as well. And if tribe mate Orlando also reblogs  my post to his site, any comments made there will appear on both mine and Johnny’s blog.  In other words there is no loss of engagement.  This is good for all involved. It’s like guest posting. Less work and more interactions. Wow. I’m all over that!

Triberr is a community of engagement, and it’s growing. There are forums called bonfires for tribe members to ask questions, get tech support, network, and more.

Tribe members also collect bones. No Triberr is not conducting secret cannibalistic rituals. Bones are the equivalent to currency. Bones are earned through activity on the site and they are spent on benefits to bloggers and to creating more tribes.

But why use Triberr? Here’s the important part. When invited to join Triberr, you become a part of an instant community. Not only are you connecting with like-minded bloggers, you are expanding your potential readership sweep. It’s share and share alike. Your post gets distributed. Tribe mates are sharing good relevant content to their followers. And followers are exposed to you. Your blog traffic grows. For authors, pffsh, it’s a no brainer.

Triberr is always improving, too. Soon the network will be integrating social media sites like Facebook and Pinterest. Can you just imagine the potential reach? Get your ooga mooga primitive groove on and check it out.

Triberr.com/

Any thoughts? Questions? Are you on Triberr and would like to share your experience? Let’s hear from you.

(This post originally appeared October 5, 2012 on The Ruby-Slippered Sisterhood blog.)

 


Pinterest for the Author

October 3, 2012

Song of the Day: Unity by Shinedown

I’m a visual person. I learn, imagine, and write visually. So it might come as no surprise that I love to whittle away time on Pinterest. Of course that might just be an oxymoron, as I don’t have much time to whittle.

The images and photography I have seen on Pinterest are amazing, breath-taking, heart-wrenching, useful, arousing, and inspiring.

But Pinterest is another social media site. And like all social media sites, there are opportunities for authors to market themselves.

Here are a few tips for making Pinterest work for you.

Indentify yourself! Fill out the About Me section. Don’t forget to add links!

Mine reads:

Author of dark, steamy, and adventuresome historical romance.

http://www.jbrayweber.com

Visitors to my page will discover who I am and where to find out more.

*Optimize driving traffic to your page by using keywords and board categorization.

Ex: Board Title: Pirates Categorization: Film, Music, Books

This narrows down searches, making it easier to find images.

*Title and describe boards to segment target market and/or audience.

Ex: Romantic Suspense, Fashion, Holiday Ideas, Recipes, Books on Writing Craft, Movies That Inspire Me, etc.

These different boards likely have different audiences. Take it further and describe the boards. Ex: Board Title: Gothic, Steampunk, and Fantasy Description: Images encouraging the fanciful illusions of my paranormal muse.

*Pin imagery that reflects you, your personality, and your brand.

*Use boards to your advantage – generate storyboards for WIPs, create boards dedicated to each of your books, add music videos that inspired books or characters, develop boards of your favorite authors; the possibilities are endless.

*Link book covers to your website or directly to buy sites like Amazon.

*Engage – repin, like, comment, respond, and follow

*Cross promote using social media integration. Pinterest has made it easy to like, tweet, and share pins. Plus, it is a great way to build an audience.

*Pin what’s trending. The reasoning? More exposure, of course.

*Quality over quantity – don’t pin for the sake of pinning. Oh, it’s easy to do. Pinning can be quite addictive. But as authors, this goes back to what defines you and your brand.

*Credit the sources.

It’s all about exposure and engagement! Stop by my page. http://pinterest.com/jbrayweber/

Do you Pinterest? Got any Pinterest tips you’d like to share? How about Pinterest questions? Let me hear from you!